Article 

African American Tribal Music – The Emancipation

Published By: Lamont Jack Pearley The Jan 1, 1863 Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln is a very important mark for the Blues People as it would forever change the dynamic of the African American experience and interactions in America, as well as the expressions that represented our daily life. Though this particular entry is titled “the Emancipation”, we will also discuss The Reconstruction Period and Jim Crow because it is as a simultaneous combustion how these three events ruptured through the African American communities. To confirm this fact, let’s just…

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Article 

Who’s Got the Blues & Why Lecture – Dr. Daphne Duval-Harrison

Published By: Lamont Jack Pearley Dr. Daphne Harrison, former Chair of the Africana Studies, and Dr. Michelle Scott, Associate Professor of History, joined the Marc Steiner Show on Tuesday, June 19, for a segment called Juneteenth: Holiday Commemorating the Abolition of Slavery in Texas. The oldest known celebration of the abolition of slavery in the United States, Juneteenth commemorates African American freedom and emphasizes education and achievement. Who’s Got the Blues & Why is presented by Dr. Daphne Duval-Harrison and takes a look at the development of “Blues” music through…

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Podcast 

Mighty Mo Rodgers – Preserving Blues, Bridging Gaps

Published by: Lamont Jack Pearley On this episode I speak with Mighty Mo Rodgers who is a record Producer, Blues man and advocate for Blues history and African American heritage. Mighty Mo Rodgers Is A Remarkably Original Singer/Songwriter Who’s Shaped His Life Experiences Into A Terrifically Eclectic And Immensely Deep Vision On His Blue Thumb Debut, Blues Is My Wailin’ Wall. Rodgers Combines Soulful, Gritty Vocals And Driving Rhythms With A Wholly Personal Panorama On Songs Like “Took Away The Drum,” “The Kennedy Song,” “Tuskegee Blues” And A Moving Tribute…

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Podcast 

Robert Kimbrough Sr – Cotton Patch Blues

Published By: Lamont Jack Pearley On this episode I speak with the son Of Legendary Junior Kimbrough….Robert Kimbrough Sr who is making his own legacy~ Robert Kimbrough, Sr. continues the Cotton Patch Blues style created by his father, the legendary Junior Kimbrough. From an early age, Robert was steeped in the sounds and life of the Mississippi Hill Country and its distinctive styles of blues. Growing up, Robert listened first-hand to Mississippi blues royalty that played with his father at home in the evenings, at Junior’s juke joint club at…

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Original Content Video 

Amiri Barak – Episode 2 African American Folklorists, Writers and The Blues

Published By: Lamont Jack Pearley Talking Bout The Blues Video series African American Folklorist, Writers and the Blues. This series highlights African American writers, folklorists, ethnologist, composers and playwriters, that documented, described and flat out canvased the Black experience through their works, connecting the dots between the Blues, Spirituals, Work songs, Prison songs and the social and economic climate of Blacks in America. This episode Highlights the works of Leroi Jones aka Amiri Baraka. Writer, Activist, Folklorist, Culture Critic, Playwriter and Author of the legendary literature Blues People which like…

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Original Content Video 

Zora Neale Hurston – Episode 3 African American Folklorists, Writers and the Blues

Published By Lamont Jack Pearley Talking Bout The Blues Video series African American Folklorist, Writers and the Blues. This series highlights African American writers, folklorists, ethnologist, composers and playwriters, that documented, described and flat out canvased the Black experience through their works, connecting the dots between the Blues, Spirituals, Work songs, Prison songs and the social and economic climate of Blacks in America. This Episode Highlights the life and works of Writer, Ethnologist and Folklorist Zora Neale Hurston. A stable of the South, a friend and colleague of Langston Hughes,…

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Podcast 

Sorrow Songs and Slave Seculars Podcast

Published By: Lamont Jack Pearley On this episode I will be discussing Sorrow Songs, Slave Seculars and the early discussions by Musicologists. Richard Wallaschek, in his Book, Primitive Music(1893) sites that Black Music is a mere imitation of European Compositions. Henry Krehbiel, was an American music critic and musicologist who believe Black Music was a Folk Song, Folk meaning of the people by the people. We will also be looking at James Weldon Johnson, Alain Locke, Mikes Mark Fisher..and more. In our interview segment, I’ll be speaking to Anthony Elder,…

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Podcast 

The Slave Narrative – Uncle Cinto Lewis

Published By: Lamont Jack Pearley On this episode of Jack Dappa Blues Heritage Radio i will be reading from and discussing the Slave Narrative of Ex- Slave Uncle Cinto Lewis. Uncle Cinto Lewis, ex-slave, claims to “be 111 years old. He lived in a brick cabin with his wife, Aunt Lucy, on the Huntington Plantation, in Brazoria Co.Texas. Miss Kate Huntington says the cabin occupied by the old couple is part of the old slave quarters built by J. Greenville McNeel, who owned the plantation before Marion Huntington, Miss Kate’s…

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Podcast 

African American Tribal Music EP1- Jack Dappa Blues Heritage Radio

Published by: Lamont Jack Pearley On our premier broadcast, Jack Dappa Blues Radio..we will discuss Columbus Day, African American Tribal Music while listening to some great Tunes! Featured topic Abolitionist, educator, and writer Charlotte Forten Grimke was born into a wealthy abolitionist family in Philadelphia. She attended Higginson Grammar School in Salem, Massachusetts, as the only African American student in a class of 200. She later studied literature and teaching at the Salem Normal School. First known recording of Black Spirituals Thomas Wentworth Higginson, who was an American Unitarian minister, author,…

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